Meet Nick

If you’re a regular reader of the New York Times, you know who columnist Nick Kristof is. If you’ve never heard the name before, you might want to catch up a little on this remarkable journalist who travels the world and tells stories people sometimes don’t want to hear.

But they listen because Kristof is a great reporter, a very good writer and a humanitarian down to the bone. He makes you care. You’ll see him in action when we watch “Reporter” in class tomorrow, a film I first saw three years at the True/False Film Festival here in Columbia.

The film documents a trip Kristof made to Africa with two college students, the winners of an essay contest Kristof sponsors each year. (Note: Five or so years ago, the contest was won by an MU journalism grad student, Casey Parks, who now works for The Oregonian.)

I think you’ll get more out of this film if you at least take a quick look at at least one Kristof column. Here’s a typical one from the period when he was trying to get the world to pay attention to the genocide in Sudan. He won a Pulitzer for his efforts.

Come back tomorrow after you’ve seen the first half of the movie; I’ll have some discussion questions posted here.

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2 Responses to Meet Nick

  1. Stephanie E. says:

    I’m so excited! I read his column all the time and just started reading his book. He’s a fantastic journalist.

  2. Kip Hill says:

    Those were some powerful images in the film this morning. If you had the same response I did, you might be at least a little heartened to read Kristof’s column from last week, “Are We Getting Nicer?” (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/24/opinion/kristof-are-we-getting-nicer.html?_r=1&ref=nicholasdkristof). And I’ll probably curl up with Stephen Moore’s “It’s Getting Better all the Time” this evening (http://www.amazon.com/Its-Getting-Better-All-Time/dp/1882577973). But, of course, I found the sociological studies Kristof cites during the film about images, statistics and willingness to make charitable contributions fascinating as well. And I’m not sure what it says about me that I wanted to go be reassured that the human race was decent (by any means possible) after I left class this morning…

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